Stats & Awareness


Stats & Awareness

Drowning is the second leading cause of death in children ages 1-14 in the United States, right behind motor vehicle traffic deaths. (Source: CDC 2003 statistics, released Fall 2005)

  • In 2005, there were 3,582 fatal unintentional drownings in the United States, not including boating-related incidents.
  • Drowning is the second leading cause of accidental injury-related death among children ages 1 to 14.
  • Drowning is the leading cause of accidental injury-related death among children ages 1 to 4.
  • In 2004, of all children 1-4 years old who died, 26% died from drowning.
  • Nineteen percent of child drowning fatalities take place in public pools with certified lifeguards on duty.
  • Males accounted for 80% of fatal drownings in the United States.
  • In 2003, 782 children aged 0-14 years died from drowning.
  • A swimming pool is 14 times more likely than a motor vehicle to be involved in the death of a child age 5 and under.
  • An average of 10 people die per day due to drowning.
  • An estimated 5,000 children ages 14 and under are hospitalized due to unintentional drowning-related incidents each year; 15% die in the hospital and as many as 20% suffer severe, permanent neurological disability.
  • African Americans between the ages of 5 and 19 are six times as likely to fatally drown in pools as whites or Hispanics.
  • According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC),
  • “drowning is the fifth leading cause of unintentional injury death for
  • people of all ages".
  • Among all states, rates of swimming pool drowning deaths are highest in Florida, Arizona, Nevada, and Mississippi.
  • For every child less than 15 years old who dies from drowning in a pool,
  • another 10 receive emergency department care for nonfatal submersion
  • injuries.
  • Young children can drown in as little as 1 inch of water. That means
  • drowning can happen where you'd least expect it - the sink, the toilet
  • bowl, fountains, buckets, pet bowls, birdbaths, wading pools, or small
  • bodies of standing water around your home, such as ditches filled with
  • rainwater.
  • (Sources: CDC)

For each drowning death, it is estimated that at least 1 to 4 children suffer a serious nonfatal submersion event, many of which leave children with permanent disabilities. (Source: Pediatrics , Vol. 112 No. 2, August 2003, pp. 440-445, Prevention of Drowning in Infants, Children, and Adolescents, Ruth A. Brenner, MD, MPH and Committee on Injury, Violence, and Poison Prevention)

1 in 5 parents mistakenly think air-filled water wings can protect their child from drowning. (Source: KidsHealth/The Nemours Foundation, June 2004, Most Kids Who Drowned Were Supervised, Study Finds)

Young children can drown in as little as 1 inch of water. That means drowning can happen where you'd least expect it - the sink, the toilet bowl, fountains, buckets, pet bowls, birdbaths, wading pools, or small bodies of standing water around your home, such as ditches filled with rainwater. (Source: KidsHealth/The Nemours Foundation, June 2004, Most Kids Who Drowned Were Supervised, Study Finds)